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Tuesday, January 2, 2007
St. Gregory Nazianzen
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Double (1955 Calendar): May 9

St. Gregory Nazianzen was born in 330 AD. As a young man, he traveled in the pursuit of learning and eventually joined his friend Basil the Great as a hermit. He was later ordained a priest and then the Bishop of Constantinople in 381. Yet with factions dividing the Church, he returned to Nazianzen, where he died on January 25th 389 or 390 AD. St. Gregory Nazianzen was called theologos because of his outstanding teaching and eloquence.

Prayer:

O All-Transcendent God (and what other name could describe you?), what words can hymn your praises? No word does you justice. What mind can probe your secret? No mind can encompass you. You are alone beyond the power of speech, yet all that we speak stems from you. You are alone beyond the power of thought, yet all that we can conceive springs from you. All things proclaim you, those endowed with reason and those bereft of it. All the expectation and pain of the world coalesces in you. All things utter a prayer to you, a silent hymn composed by you. You sustain everything that exists, and all things move together to your orders. You are the goal of all that exists. You are one and you are all, yet you are none of the things that exist - neither a part nor the whole. You can avail yourself of any name; how shall I call you, the only unnameable? All-transcendent God!

Prayer Source: Written by St. Gregory Nazianzen

Prayer:

O God, Who didst give blessed Gregory to Thy people as a minister of eternal salvation: grant, we beseech Thee, that we, who have had him for our teacher on earth, may deserve to have him for our advocate in heaven. Through our Lord.

Prayer Source: 1962 Roman Catholic Daily Missal

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