Saturday, January 21, 2006
St. Agnes
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Double (1955 Calendar): January 21
Memorial (1969 Calendar): January 21

Today the Church celebrates the sainthood of St. Agnes, virgin and martyr. St. Agnes lived around 250 AD and died very young at 12 or 13 years old.

She was a very beautiful girl with many men offering marriages. But, St. Agnes wished to remain pure to God as a virgin, so one of these men, the son of the governor, contacted Roman officials about her being a Christian. She was dragged to a Roman temple and threatened with rape, but she refused to reject Jesus Christ as Our Lord.

The Governor tried to persuade Agnes to change her mind by forcing her walk naked through the Roman city naked, but her hair miraculously grew to cover her body. The Governor ordered St. Agnes to be burned at the stake, but the flames did not harm her.. She was then sent to the lions, but they refused to attack her. The son of the Governor entered and was immediately attacked by the lions. Agnes prayed for the man's health and he was restored. The Governor then had St. Agnes beheaded. She was buried in a catacomb in Rome that was named after here.

"But if as a Christian, let him not be ashamed, but let him glorify God in that name" (1 Peter 4:16)

Please learn more about the special tradition by the Pope to bless two lambs on the feastday of St. Agnes.  Also see the special post on the Agnus Dei Sacramental.

Prayer:

Almighty and everlasting God, Who dost choose the weak things of the world to confound the strong: mercifully grant that we who keep the solemn feast of blessed Agnes, Thy Virgin and Martyr, may experience her advocacy with Thee. Through our Lord.

Prayer Source: 1962 Roman Catholic Daily Missal
Image Source: Believed to be in the Public Domain, Title Unknown

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